The top 10 things writers using CMOS should know

Every writer worth their salt works on their craft. Whether you’re reading competitors or doing grammar exercises, that writer brain of yours is learning. There’s a lot to learn, though, especially when you’re trying to match a specific style guide in your writing. Cheat sheet would be too generous of a name, but this article outlines the top 10 things you should know when using the Chicago Manual of Style.

What is a title information sheet and when would I need one?

In publishing, when your book gets presented to the editorial team as a real candidate for selling, your story will be reduced to a single page of to-the-point information known as the title information sheet. This piece of paper is the marketing pitch for your book, and contains important printing details the publisher will need to know for pricing reasons (among other things). So what goes into a title information sheet?

What style guide should I use?

Style guides are used by publishing companies to help them define the rules of language they’ll follow for their publications. While authors may not need intimate knowledge of one, understanding the purpose of each and maybe even learning a couple of rules to improve consistency in your writing is a great idea. Figuring out what style guide to use is pretty simple, and we’ll overview what factors you should consider in this article.

What is a style sheet and how do I make one?

An under-used tool amongst writers, the style sheet is the go-to reference for editors. Why? Simply put: A style sheet helps you maintain consistency, keep track of important dates and characters, and even reminds you whether you preferred the Oxford comma or not (you heathen).

What are beta readers and why do you need them?

Whether this is your first project or your seventh book, beta readers will give you a broader perspective of your content. If you choose them well, they’ll provide you with insights about narrative development, believability, and impact. In this article, I’ll talk about why you need beta readers, how to find them, and what to look for when selecting them.

How to self-edit (properly) in 5 steps

Oh, what? An editor saying you can self-edit? Don’t get too excited. You can do it, and you should do it, but you should not be the last person to do it. That said, there are some pretty standard steps involved when reviewing your work before you send it out into the world (or even to an editor!).

Why on earth do you need an editor?

The goal of any editor is to bring out the strongest version of the text in front of us, no matter what stage it’s at. We are ever-so-careful of the suggestions and comments we make as we strive for better understanding of the material and its design. You have a goal in mind for this work and we’re the intermediary who helps you reach your target audience the most effectively.